Prevalence and Predictors of Higher-Risk Supplement Use Among Collegiate Athletes

Sassone, J, Muster, M, and Barrack, MT. Prevalence and predictors of higher-risk supplement use among National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000–000, 2018—This study aimed to identify the prevalence and predictors associated with the use of higher-risk dietary supplements, defined as supplements containing herbal ingredients, caffeine, or those classified for weight loss, muscle-building, or as a preworkout supplement, among 557 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I male and female collegiate athletes. Although 252 (45.2%) athletes reported the use of a dietary supplement on ≥2 days per week over the past year, 46 (8.3%) athletes met criteria for higher-risk supplement use. Twenty (3.6%) athletes reported the use of herbal, 1 (0.2%) caffeinated, 5 (0.9%) weight loss, 28 (5.0%) preworkout, and 1 (0.2%) muscle-building supplements. Body mass index status (BMI ≥30 kg·m−2), sport-type (sports using the phosphocreatine energy system), and college year (≥4th year) were associated with the use of preworkout, muscle-building, or herbal supplements. A multiple regression analysis identified predictors of higher-risk supplement use including the number of dietary supplements used in the past year (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7–2.7, p < 0.001), the reported motivation of taking dietary supplements to gain muscle and lose body fat (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.1–11.7, p = 0.04), and the motivation to increase athletic endurance (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.6–9.9, p < 0.005). These factors may be considered as a part of a screening process to evaluate athletes with an increased risk of higher-risk supplement use and potential consequences to health or eligibility status. 


Autor / Fonte:John Sassone, Mark Muster, Michelle T Barrack Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2018 December 7
Link: https://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/publishahead/Prevalence_and_Predictors_of_Higher_Risk.95039.aspx