Occupational Vocal Health of Elite Sports Coaches: An Exploratory Pilot Study of Football Coaches

Summary

Objective

To explore the occupational voice use and vocal health of elite football coaches.

Study Design

This pilot study explored coaches' voice use patterns and vocal demands across workplace environments. Each coach's experiences of voice symptoms and voice problems were also investigated.

Methods

Twelve Australian professional football coaches participated in a mixed-methods data collection approach. Data were collected through acoustic voice measurement (Ambulatory Phonation Monitor), semistructured interviews, and a voice symptom questionnaire (Voice Capabilities Questionnaire).

Results

Acoustic measures suggested heavy vocal loads for coaches during player training. All participants reported experiencing voice symptoms. They also suggested that the structure of their working week, workplace tasks, and vocal demands impacted on their voices. Despite this, participants reported little previous reflection or awareness of what impacted on their voices. Coaches typically did not consider how to support their voices during daily work and discussed experiencing voice symptoms as an inevitable part of their jobs.

Conclusions

This study demonstrates that occupational vocal demands may negatively impact on sports coaches' vocal health. This is particularly important, considering coaches' heavy vocal loads across coaching tasks and reported negative occupational vocal health experience. Furthermore, coaches' limited insight into voice use and vocal health management may impact on their vocal performance and health. Given the exploratory nature of this study, further research into coaches' occupational vocal health is warranted.


Autor / Fonte:Katie L Buckley, Paul D O´Halloran, Jennifer M Oates Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation 2015 February 27
Link: http://www.jvoice.org/article/S0892-1997(14)00203-3/abstract