Maximal rate of heart rate increase correlates with fatigue/recovery status in female cyclists

Abstract

Purpose

Being able to identify how an athlete is responding to training would be useful to optimise adaptation and performance. The maximal rate of heart rate increase (rHRI), a marker of heart rate acceleration has been shown to correlate with performance changes in response to changes in training load in male athletes; however, it has not been established if it also correlates with performance changes in female athletes.

Methods

rHRI and cycling performance were assessed in six female cyclists following 7 days of light training (LT), 14 days of heavy training (HT) and a 10 day taper period. rHRI was the first derivative maximum of a sigmoidal curve fit to R-R data recorded during 5 min of cycling at 100 W. Cycling performance was assessed as work done (kJ) during time-trials of 5 (5TT) and 60 (60TT) min duration.

Results

5TT was possibly decreased at HT (ES ± 90% confidence interval = − 0.16 ± 0.25; p = 0.60), while, 5TT and 60TT very likely to almost certainly increased from HT to taper (ES = 0.71 ± 0.24; p = 0.007 and ES = 0.42 ± 0.19; p = 0.02, respectively). Large within-subject correlations were found between rHRI, and 5TT (r = 0.65 ± 0.37; p = 0.02) and 60TT (r = 0.70 ± 0.31; p = 0.008).

Conclusions

rHRI during the transition from rest to light exercise correlates with training induced-changes in exercise performance in females, suggesting that rHRI may be a useful monitoring tool for female athletes.

Keywords

Heart rate Performance Fatigue monitoring Cycling Autonomic function 

Abbreviations

FOR

Functional overreaching

NFOR

Non-functional overreaching

OTS

Overtraining syndrome

ANS

Autonomic nervous system

HR

Heart rate

HRR

Heart rate recovery

HRV

Heart rate variability

rHRI

Maximal rate of heart rate increase

LT

7 day, light training period

HT

14 day, heavy training period

5TT

5 min maximal cycling time-trial

60TT

60 min maximal cycling time-trial

kJ

Kilojoules

W

Watts

TRIMP

Training impulse

Bpm

Beats per minute

SD

Standard deviation

ES

Effect size


Autor / Fonte:Maximillian J Nelson, Clint R Bellenger, Rebecca L Thomson, Eileen Y Robertson, Kade Davison, Daniela Schäfer Olstad, Jonathan D Buckley European Journal of Applied Physiology 2017 October 9
Link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-017-3728-4