Whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults

Abstract

Background

Recovery strategies are often used with the intention of preventing or minimising muscle soreness after exercise. Whole-body cryotherapy, which involves a single or repeated exposure(s) to extremely cold dry air (below -100 °C) in a specialised chamber or cabin for two to four minutes per exposure, is currently being advocated as an effective intervention to reduce muscle soreness after exercise.

Objectives

To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of whole-body cryotherapy (extreme cold air exposure) for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the British Nursing Index and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. We also searched the reference lists of articles, trial registers and conference proceedings, handsearched journals and contacted experts.The searches were run in August 2015.

Selection criteria

We aimed to include randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compared the use of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) versus a passive or control intervention (rest, no treatment or placebo treatment) or active interventions including cold or contrast water immersion, active recovery and infrared therapy for preventing or treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. We also aimed to include randomised trials that compared different durations or dosages of WBC. Our prespecified primary outcomes were muscle soreness, subjective recovery (e.g. tiredness, well-being) and adverse effects.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened search results, selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted and cross-checked data. Where appropriate, we pooled results of comparable trials. The random-effects model was used for pooling where there was substantial heterogeneity. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE.

Main results

Four laboratory-based randomised controlled trials were included. These reported results for 64 physically active predominantly young adults (mean age 23 years). All but four participants were male. Two trials were parallel group trials (44 participants) and two were cross-over trials (20 participants). The trials were heterogeneous, including the type, temperature, duration and frequency of WBC, and the type of preceding exercise. None of the trials reported active surveillance of predefined adverse events. All four trials had design features that carried a high risk of bias, potentially limiting the reliability of their findings. The evidence for all outcomes was classified as 'very low' quality based on the GRADE criteria.

Two comparisons were tested: WBC versus control (rest or no WBC), tested in four studies; and WBC versus far-infrared therapy, also tested in one study. No studies compared WBC with other active interventions, such as cold water immersion, or different types and applications of WBC.

All four trials compared WBC with rest or no WBC. There was very low quality evidence for lower self-reported muscle soreness (pain at rest) scores after WBC at 1 hour (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.42 to -0.12; 20 participants, 2 cross-over trials); 24 hours (SMD -0.57, 95% CI -1.48 to 0.33) and 48 hours (SMD -0.58, 95% CI -1.37 to 0.21), both with 38 participants, 2 cross-over studies, 1 parallel group study; and 72 hours (SMD -0.65, 95% CI -2.54 to 1.24; 29 participants, 1 cross-over study, 1 parallel group study). Of note is that the 95% CIs also included either no between-group differences or a benefit in favour of the control group. One small cross-over trial (9 participants) found no difference in tiredness but better well-being after WBC at 24 hours post exercise. There was no report of adverse events.

One small cross-over trial involving nine well-trained runners provided very low quality evidence of lower levels of muscle soreness after WBC, when compared with infrared therapy, at 1 hour follow-up, but not at 24 or 48 hours. The same trial found no difference in well-being but less tiredness after WBC at 24 hours post exercise. There was no report of adverse events.

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient evidence to determine whether whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) reduces self-reported muscle soreness, or improves subjective recovery, after exercise compared with passive rest or no WBC in physically active young adult males. There is no evidence on the use of this intervention in females or elite athletes. The lack of evidence on adverse events is important given that the exposure to extreme temperature presents a potential hazard. Further high-quality, well-reported research in this area is required and must provide detailed reporting of adverse events.

Plain language summary

Whole-body cryotherapy for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise

Background and aim of the review

Delayed onset muscle soreness describes the muscular pain, tenderness and stiffness experienced after high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise. Various therapies are in use to prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise and to enhance recovery. One more recent therapy that is growing in use is whole-body cryotherapy (WBC). This involves single or repeated exposure(s) to extremely cold dry air (below -100°C) in a specialised chamber or cabin for two to four minutes per exposure. This review aimed to find out whether WBC reduced muscle soreness, improved recovery and was safe for those people for whom it can be used.

Results of the search

We searched medical databases up to August 2015 for studies that compared WBC with a control intervention such as passive rest or no treatment; or with another active intervention such as cold water immersion. We found four small studies. These reported results for a total of 64 physically active young adults. All but four participants were male. The studies were very varied such as the type, temperature, duration and frequency of the WBC and the exercises used to induce muscle soreness. There were two comparisons: WBC compared with a control intervention; and WBC compared with far-infrared therapy.

Key results

All four studies compared WBC with either passive rest or no treatment. These provided some evidence that WBC may reduce muscle soreness (pain at rest) at 1, 24, 48 and 72 hours after exercise. However, the evidence also included the possibility that WBC may not make a difference or may make the pain worse. There was some weak evidence that WBC may improve well-being at 24 hours. There was no report and probably no monitoring of adverse events in these four studies.

One very small study also compared WBC with far-infrared therapy and reported lower levels of muscle soreness one hour after the treatment.

Quality of the evidence

All four studies had aspects that could undermine the reliability of their results. We decided that the evidence was of very low quality for all outcomes. Thus, the findings remain very uncertain and further research may provide evidence that could change our conclusions.

Conclusions

The currently available evidence is insufficient to support the use of WBC for preventing and treating muscle soreness after exercise in adults. Furthermore, the best prescription of WBC and its safety are not known.

Résumé scientifique

Cryothérapie corps entier (exposition à un air froid extrême) dans la prévention et le traitement des douleurs musculaires post-exercice chez l'adulte

Contexte

Les stratégies de récupération sont régulièrement utilisées dans le but de prévenir ou minimiser les courbatures consécutives d'un exercice. La cryothérapie corps entier, qui implique une exposition simple ou répétée à un air froid sec extrême (inférieur à -100°C) dans une chambre spécialisée ou une cabine pendant deux à quatre minutes par exposition, est actuellement recommandée comme un traitement efficace pour réduire les courbatures post-exercice.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets (avantages et inconvénients) de la cryothérapie corps entier (exposition à un air froid extrême) pour prévenir et traiter les courbatures post-exercice chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Des recherches ont été effectuées dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, le British Nursing Index et la Physiotherapy Evidence Database. La recherche a également été effectuée à partir des bibliographies des articles, des registres d'études, des actes de conférences, à l'aide de recherches manuelles dans des revues et par contact auprès des experts. Les recherches ont été conduites en août 2015.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons cherché à inclure les essais randomisés et quasi randomisés comparant l'utilisation de la cryothérapie du corps entier (WBC) à une intervention passive ou de contrôle (repos, aucun traitement ou traitement placebo) ou à des interventions actives, incluant l'immersion en eau froide ou alternée, la récupération active et la thérapie infrarouge, pour prévenir et traiter les courbatures post-exercice chez l'adulte. Nous avons également cherché à inclure les essais randomisés qui ont comparé différentes durées ou doses de WBC. Les critères principaux prédéterminés étaient la douleur musculaire, la récupération subjective (par exemple la fatigue, le bien-être) et les effets indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment trié les résultats, sélectionné les études, évalué les risques de biais puis extrait et procédé à une vérification croisée des résultats. Le cas échéant, nous avons regroupé les résultats des essais comparables. Le modèle à effets aléatoires a été utilisé pour le regroupement lorsqu'il y avait une hétérogénéité substantielle. Nous avons évalué la qualité des preuves en utilisant le système GRADE.

Résultats principaux

Quatre études randomisées et contrôlées en laboratoire ont été incluses. Ces résultats sont rapportés pour 64 adultes physiquement actifs principalement jeunes (âge moyen 23 ans). Tous les participants sauf quatre sont de sexe masculin. Deux études ont été conduites sur des groupes parallèles (44 participants) et deux étaient des essais croisés (20 participants). Les essais étaient hétérogènes, que ce soit en terme de température, de durée, de fréquence, de type de WBC ou du type d'exercice précédent. Aucun des essais n'a rapporté une surveillance active des effets indésirables prédéfinis. Chacun des quatre essais présentait des caractéristiques de conception qui comportaient un risque élevé de biais, limitant potentiellement la fiabilité de leurs résultats. La qualité du niveau de preuve des résultats a été classée comme « très faible » sur la base du système GRADE.

Deux comparaisons ont été testées : WBC versus contrôle (repos ou absence de WBC), testée dans quatre études ; et WBC versus thérapie à infrarouge long, également testée dans une étude. Aucune étude n'a comparé WBC avec d'autres interventions actives, telles que l'immersion en eau froide, ou différents types ou applications de WBC.

Chacune des quatre études a comparé WBC avec une situation de repos ou d'absence de WBC. Le niveau de preuves a été qualifié de très faible sur la diminution des scores des courbatures auto-déclarées (douleurs au repos) après WBC à 1h (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) -0,77 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de -1,42 à -0,12 ; 20 participants, 2 études croisés) ; à 24 heures (DMS -0,57 ; IC à 95 % de -1,48 à 0,33) et à 48 heures (DMS -0,58 ; IC à 95 % de -1,37 à 0,21), 38 participants, 2 études croisées, 1 étude à groupe parallèle ; et à 72 heures (DMS -0,65 ; IC à 95 % de -2,54 to 1,24 ; 29 participants, 1 étude croisée, 1 étude à groupe parallèle). Il convient de noter que dans les IC à 95 % sont également inclus soit aucune différence entre les groupes, soit un avantage en faveur du groupe contrôle. Une petite étude croisée (9 participants) n'a observé aucune différence sur la fatigue mais un meilleur bien-être après WBC 24 heures après l'exercice. Il n'y avait aucune mention d'effets indésirables.

Une petite étude croisée impliquant neuf coureurs bien entraînés a montré un niveau de preuve qualifié de très faible sur la diminution du niveau de courbatures après WBC comparativement à la thérapie par infrarouge à 1 heure, mais rien à 24 ou 48 heures. La même étude n'a observé aucun effet sur le bien-être mais moins de fatigue après WBC 24 heures après l'exercice. Il n'y avait aucune mention d'effets indésirables.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'y a pas suffisamment d'éléments de preuves pour déterminer si la cryothérapie corps entier (WBC) réduit les courbatures auto-déclarées ou améliore la récupération subjective après l'exercice par rapport aux situations de repos passif ou d'absence de WBC chez les jeunes hommes adultes physiquement actifs. Il n'y a aucune preuve sur l'utilisation de cette intervention chez les femmes ou les athlètes d'élite. Le manque de preuves sur les effets indésirables est important étant donné que l'exposition à des températures extrêmes présente un danger potentiel. Des recherches de plus haute qualité et adéquatement consignées dans ce domaine sont nécessaires. Elles devront également fournir des rapports détaillés des événements indésirables.

Résumé simplifié

Cryothérapie du corps entier pour la prévention et le traitement des douleurs musculaires après l'exercice

Contexte et objectif de la revue

Les courbatures désignent la douleur, la sensibilité et la raideur musculaires consécutives à un exercice physique intense ou inhabituel. Diverses thérapies sont utilisés pour prévenir ou réduire les courbatures après l'exercice et pour améliorer la récupération. Une thérapie plus récente dont l'utilisation se développe est la cryothérapie du corps entier. Ce traitement implique une exposition simple ou répétée à un air froid sec extrême (inférieur à -100°C) dans une chambre spécialisée ou une cabine pendant deux à quatre minutes par exposition. Cette revue a cherché à savoir si la cryothérapie du corps entier réduisait la douleur musculaire, améliorait la récupération et était sans danger pour les personnes chez lesquelles elle peut être utilisée.

Résultats de la recherche

Nous avons cherché dans des bases de données médicales jusqu'en août 2015 des études comparant la cryothérapie du corps entier à une intervention de contrôle comme le repos passif ou l'absence de traitement, ou à une autre intervention active comme l'immersion dans l'eau froide. Nous avons trouvé quatre petites études. Celles-ci rapportaient des résultats pour un total de 64 jeunes adultes physiquement actifs. Tous les participants sauf quatre étaient de sexe masculin. Les études étaient très variées, par exemple en termes du type, de la température, de la durée et de la fréquence de la cryothérapie du corps entier, et des exercices utilisés pour induire des douleurs musculaires. Il y avait deux comparaisons, la cryothérapie du corps entier par rapport à une intervention de contrôle et par rapport à la thérapie à infrarouge long.

Principaux résultats

Les quatre études ont comparé la cryothérapie du corps entier au repos passif ou à l'absence de traitement. Ces études apportent quelques éléments de preuve indiquant que la cryothérapie du corps entier pourrait réduire les courbatures (douleur au repos) à 1, 24, 48 et 72 heures après l'exercice. Toutefois, ces données englobent également la possibilité que la cryothérapie du corps entier puisse ne faire aucune différence, ou aggraver la douleur. Certains éléments de preuve de faible qualité suggèrent que la cryothérapie du corps entier pourrait améliorer le bien-être à 24 heures. Il n'y avait aucun rapport et probablement pas de suivi des événements indésirables dans ces quatre études.

Une étude de très petite taille a aussi comparé la cryothérapie du corps entier par rapport à la thérapie à infrarouge long ; elle rapporte des niveaux inférieurs de douleur musculaire une heure après le traitement.

Qualité des preuves

Les quatre études incluses présentaient des aspects pouvant affecter la fiabilité de leurs résultats. Nous avons jugé que les preuves étaient de qualité très faible pour tous les critères de jugement. Par conséquent, nos conclusions restent incertaines et des recherches supplémentaires sont susceptibles de fournir des données qui pourraient les modifier.

Conclusions

Les données probantes actuellement disponibles sont insuffisantes pour appuyer l'utilisation de la cryothérapie du corps entier dans la prévention et le traitement des courbatures consécutives à l'exercice physique chez les adultes. En outre, la meilleure indication pour la cryothérapie du corps entier et sa sécurité d'utilisation ne sont pas établies.

Notes de traduction

Traduction du résumé d'article : Dr François Bieuzen.


Autor / Fonte:Joseph T Costello, Philip Ra Baker, Geoffrey M Minett, Francois Bieuzen, Ian B Stewart, Chris Bleakley Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2015 September 18, 9: CD010789
Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD010789.pub2/epdf