Exercise for depression in older adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials adjusting for publication bias

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the antidepressant effects of exercise in older adults, using randomized controlled trial (RCT) data.

METHODS:

We conducted a meta-analysis of exercise in older adults, addressing limitations of previous works. RCTs of exercise interventions in older people with depression (≥ 60 years) comparing exercise vs. control were eligible. A random-effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) (95% confidence interval [95%CI]), meta-regressions, and trim, fill, and fail-safe number analyses were conducted.

RESULTS:

Eight RCTs were included, representing 138 participants in exercise arms and 129 controls. Exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD = -0.90 [95%CI -0.29 to -1.51]), with a fail-safe number of 71 studies. Significant effects were found for 1) mixed aerobic and anaerobic interventions, 2) at moderate intensity, 3) that were group-based, 4) that utilized mixed supervised and unsupervised formats, and 5) in people without other clinical comorbidities.

CONCLUSION:

Adjusting for publication bias increased the beneficial effects of exercise in three subgroup analysis, suggesting that previous meta-analyses have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. We advocate that exercise be considered as a routine component of the management of depression in older adults.

Key words: Exercise; depression; older adults; publication bias; meta-analysis 

 


Autor / Fonte:Felipe B Schuch, Davy Vancampfort, Simon Rosenbaum, Justin Richards, Philip B Ward, Nicola Veronese, Marco Solmi, Eduardo L Cadore, Brendon Stubbs Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria 2016 July 18
Link: http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbp/2016nahead/1516-4446-rbp-1516444620161915.pdf