Achilles tendon material properties are greater in the jump leg of jumping athletes.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The Achilles tendon (AT) must adapt to meet changes in demands. This study explored AT adaptation by comparing properties within the jump and non-jump legs of jumping athletes. Non-jumping control athletes were included to control limb dominance effects.

METHODS:

AT properties were assessed in the preferred (jump) and non-preferred (lead) jumping legs of male collegiate-level long and/or high jump (jumpers; n=10) and cross-country (controls; n=10) athletes. Cross-sectional area (CSA), elongation, and force during isometric contractions were used to estimate the morphological, mechanical and material properties of the ATs bilaterally.

RESULTS:

Jumpers exposed their ATs to more force and stress than controls (all p≤0.03). AT force and stress were also greater in the jump leg of both jumpers and controls than in the lead leg (all p<0.05). Jumpers had 17.8% greater AT stiffness and 24.4% greater Young's modulus in their jump leg compared to lead leg (all p<0.05). There were no jump versus lead leg differences in AT stiffness or Young's modulus within controls (all p>0.05).

CONCLUSION:

ATs chronically exposed to elevated mechanical loading were found to exhibit greater mechanical (stiffness) and material (Young's modulus) properties.

PMID:
 
27282454
 
[PubMed - in process] 
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Autor / Fonte:A J Bayliss, A M Weatherholt, T T Crandall, D L Farmer, J C McConnell, K M Crossley, S J Warden Journal of Musculoskeletal & Neuronal Interactions 2016, 16 (2): 105-12
Link: http://www.ismni.org/jmni/pdf/64/jmni_16_105.pdf